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A collection of GRIVdom. George Ryals internet resources.

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  • A collection of GRIVdom. George Ryals internet resources.

    AIM: Create a reference collection to useful GRIV stuff.
    Instructions: Just post links. Discuss in other threads.

    You can utterly expect my derision and humiliation if you don't follow the instructions.


    Training to overcome target panic

    http://www.archerylearningcenter.com...ic-yes-you-can


    Stabilisers

    http://www.archerylearningcenter.com/blog/stabilizers



    Podcasts:

    http://www.upshot.fm/episodes/002


    http://naturalbornhunter.podbean.com...hes-out-there/

    http://www.outdoorpodcastchannel.lib...rge-griv-ryals

    STAN release aid instructions..

    Torqueless D Loop

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yz88pX-EoII


    Release Aids and Shot Execution.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lwxnbrGAvw



    Paper Tuning.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ur3hZ4wiMFs


    Eliminating face pressure.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miNue_WmJ50


    Eliminating low hanging shots. Part 1 and 2


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gexDLptcios


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJbu3GtfUro


    Grip Placement. Part 1 and 2


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1p7mGdFNBE



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFIq0-Qde3k


    Draw, Peep Alignment and Bow Length

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbU6du9b-eg



    1st, 2nd and 3rd Axis


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJ9egP3va10


    Release Mechanics


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNslq2UEiWM


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8glZiI9fUw


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1t0wTr6nZ-A
    Last edited by Andy!; 6th September 2016, 09:42 PM.
    Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
    Performance cannot be purchased.

    "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.


  • #2
    Thanks, great set of resources all in one place.

    Now, all we have to do is figure out how to pronounce GRIV.
    Is it "griv", as in "give" with an r inserted?
    Or is it "g r four"?

    Comment


    • #3
      Read the ****ing instructions.
      Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
      Performance cannot be purchased.

      "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.

      Comment


      • #4
        Got a link? I tried googling "how to pronounce griv" and got a lot of results, but none of them related to George Ryals IV.
        Last edited by Stash; 6th September 2016, 12:08 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Collected from the Internet:
          Addition: also the same as found above at http://www.archerylearningcenter.com...ic-yes-you-can

          Target Panic: Causes and cures.
          By George Ryals

          I have gotten tons of target panic and shot execution questions lately now that everyone is headed back to the indoor range. I thought I would take a second and outline my thoughts on target panic and how I cured myself and helped others.

          First of all, it is not caused by the release or what type of sight or aiming reticle you use. Changing release styles to a Stan style (triggerless), pinky, or middle finger activated release is only the first step. By changing the release you have a chance to train yourself with a new and hopefully correct habit. But, you have to treat the root of the issue to be totally free.

          What is the root of the problem? I think it is very important to really understand where it came from before you can begin learning proper shot execution from the ground up.

          Here’s how it happens to most people…

          Many shooters start their release shooting career with a simple set of instructions. “Put the pin in the middle and squeeeeeeze the trigger.” It sounds simple enough, but there is one problem. As a new shooter, you can’t hold the pin in the middle of the target and monkey around with a new release aid at the same time. Eventually they unknowingly slip into a pattern of touching off the trigger as the sight wobbles over the center of the target. In the beginning they see fairly good accuracy and continue to imbed a reflexive trigger response.

          Basically over time the shooter develops a hardwired connection between their trigger finger and their eye. The eye sees the pin cross the middle and it triggers the fire reflex. In target shooters this problem manifests itself as a rapid increase in scores and then a jagged average after that. The good days and the bad days are very far apart and the bad days are made worse by pressure and over-trying. The snowballing effect of pressure can be very frustrating at this stage.

          The shooter first becomes aware of the problem when trying to increase their scores to the next level. As they become more stable and can hold the pin still on the target, subconsciously they hold off of the center because they are “not ready to shoot”. This slowly becomes freezing. Shooters then try to ease the pin or dot carefully into the center of the target. This works for a short time until their trigger reflex begins shooting too early. It is usually at this point a shooter realizes that there is a problem and they finally can feel the loss of control in their shot execution. Just after the freezing stage is the uncontrollable flinching, jerking, and the frustration from the total loss of control.

          The good news is that you can break this habit just about as simply as you learned it. it just takes time and steady, dilligent work.

          First, changing releases will help because it will be easier to learn a new release style. I have seen very few people who could learn to shoot their old release effectively, but once proper technique is learned many have great success going back to their old releases.

          Second, you need to properly learn how to activate the release and what it feels like when it is happening correctly. The easiest way I know of to do this is to make a loop of string that when looped over your bow hand and hooked to the release, it can be drawn back like a bow and it fits your draw length. The loop will simulate a bow and help you learn to pull through the release. The key here is to shoot your new release over and over and develop the feel of a surprise shot without the distraction of the bow and sight. Because of the connection between the sight, your eye, and the target is what triggers the response; you have to eliminate the sight and target for now. (incedentally, I use this technique everytime I try a new release)

          When you are shooting the loop, learn to relax your release hand through the releasing process. Here’s how it works. While you have the shooting loop at full draw, develop tension in the loop. Wrap your finger around the trigger or set your fingers on the triggerless release deeply and pull against the loop. You should feel the pressure building against the pads of your fingers. As that pressure builds allow your index and middle fingers to yield against the pressure. It will be almost as if your fingers are relaxing out of the release. This yielding creates a transfer of power from the finger beds to your trigger finger applying pressure to the button causing it to fire on its own time. If you are shooting a Stan, the pressure will transfer from your index finger to your third or fourth finger causing the release to pivot enough to fire. NOTE: when this is done correctly, someone watching will barely notice a change or any movement. It is more of a power transfer than a movement.

          Continue to practice this and stay away from your bow until you have it perfected and you have done it enough to be habit. I am talking a couple weeks (depending on how bad your problem is.) Resist the urge to advance too quickly. This is what got you to where you are now. You want to build a good strong foundation of habit that will stay with you from now on. You will want to practice this step until it is an automatic response.

          The next step is transferring the feel to your bow. Take the sight off your bow and remove the target from the bale. Shoot arrows at a very close range with your eyes closed. Concentrate only on making the feel exactly like it was on the loop. Do this for a week if you have to. Only advance when you have it down perfect and it is an automatic response or habit.

          Now you can put your sight on the bow and get at about 5 yards. This step requires a little visualization skill that you will have to learn as you go. Draw your bow and line up the sight with the blank bale. Then close your eyes and visualize the dot slowly floating in the X-ring, and then execute the shot. Continue to practice this and make sure that you visualize the dot floating in the x. You will hardly ever see it sit still so you will need to make it as realistic as possible. Continue to practice this for at least a week or more depending on how bad your issue was.

          Finally you get to put a target up on the bale… But you can’t shoot it yet. During this step you will develop a new habit. You will learn to confidently approach the target and get used to the idea that the pin or dot can be in the middle without immediately triggering the shot. Stand at about five yards and do these steps

          1. Look at the X you want to shoot
          2. Keeping your vision on that X, draw your bow
          3. Keep your vision on the X and move into your anchor
          4. The move the peep and scope into view of your eye and it should line up with the X you are looking at.
          5. Pause on the X, watch it float, and after about 8 seconds or so let down. Take time to get a good look at it, get used to it.

          Make sure you splash the dot or pin right into the middle of the X and let it float. Resist the urge to creep into it. Repeat this at 5 yards until you feel good about it, then move to 10 and repeat again. Once you have a good feel for that, move to 15 and then 20. This will give you a good idea of what sight movement really is and let you show yourself that you can hold on the X. The whole object of this exercise is to desensitize yourself and eliminate the connection between your eye, target, and release.

          Now it’s been about 6 weeks and you should be ready to shoot your first shots. Set up at five yards and try to recreate actual shooting conditions. You should keep score and write it down, even go as far as use an official league score card. Shoot a full game on the target of your choosing. I prefer to score FITA style on a Vegas face, but if the NFAA Nationals are near, I will use a five spot. Concentrate on shooting the shot correctly and just let the sight float. Be on guard and don’t let old habits sneak in. Make yourself comfortable with holding in the middle while allowing the shot to smoothly and naturally execute. If you are completing this with no trouble at all and are shooting perfect shots after a couple days, you can move on, but only advance when you have mastered the release.

          Now you have mastered 5 yards you will move to ten and continue scoring and shooting. Spend a week or two here and continue until you have mastered ten and can go through a full game without a single bad shot. Next move on to 15 and then 20.

          By the time you make it out to 20, you should be in control of your shot and be well on your way to shooting top scores. There will still be rough days and minor relapses. If you experience trouble, go right back to 10 yards and shoot some 10 yard games to re-affirm the feel and the flow of good shooting. This all may seem like a lot to go through and taking half a season off to fix yourself is a price you have to pay. I will guarantee you that all the boredom and minutia that you go through during this process will be well worth it in the end and it will reward you will a long and full career of enjoyable shooting.

          You just have to ask yourself, “how bad to I want it”. I spent about 4 months with the initial steps that I have outlined here, but it took about 2 years before I shot my first tournament all the way through without a hint of TP.
          Last edited by Andy!; 7th September 2016, 03:32 PM.
          Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
          Performance cannot be purchased.

          "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.

          Comment


          • #6
            New Bowjunky podcast as of today.

            http://bowjunkymedia.libsyn.com/bowjunky-podcast-ep13
            Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
            Performance cannot be purchased.

            "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.

            Comment


            • #7
              Another Bowjunky GRIV podcast

              http://bowjunkymedia.libsyn.com/bowj...dest_id=403050
              Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
              Performance cannot be purchased.

              "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.

              Comment


              • #8
                That was a really good listen I am happy to here the X3 cam is like the C2 cam
                3 Prices in life
                1 The price you paid
                2 The price you told her you paid
                3 The you pay when she finds out the real price you paid

                People who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us that who do

                Comment


                • #9
                  https://youtu.be/iIQo0fZVIro
                  Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
                  Performance cannot be purchased.

                  "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    "Hi I'm the neighborhood boob inspector..."
                    Urban Archery
                    Carbon Express
                    Beiter
                    Truball/Axcel
                    Redback Strings

                    Before enlightenment: Chop wood, carry water
                    After enlightenment: Chop wood, carry water

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2kMSxXtyxk
                      Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
                      Performance cannot be purchased.

                      "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8TFabYz-fA
                        Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
                        Performance cannot be purchased.

                        "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.

                        Comment

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