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Weight Training for Archery!

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  • Weight Training for Archery!

    Hi all,

    I have a question.

    I have been a athlete pretty much all my life played a lot of rugby, did power lifting for a number of years yada yada a big component of any of these sports and performing at a high level has been incorporating weights into my training program.

    A few people have mentioned that lifting too heavy can be bad for the this sport any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
    "Audentes fortuna iuvat" - "Fortune favors the bold"

  • #2
    Nobody has specifically demonstrated that strength is not beneficial.
    However, getting your bowstring snagged on your bicep is never conducive to accuracy.
    I expect that it also hurts like a bitch.
    Status is not defined by the amount of gear in your signature.
    Performance cannot be purchased.

    "The Internet offers everything - except quality control" - K. Anders Ericsson.

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    • #3
      General strength training particularly core and shoulder work is of benefit. However I have never found a 'thing' in the gym that can directly help my archery. That said I have found that large amounts of body work have proved more effective than heavy lifting for archery. The best method I've found (excuse the pun) is SPT.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Andy! View Post
        Nobody has specifically demonstrated that strength is not beneficial.
        However, getting your bowstring snagged on your bicep is never conducive to accuracy.
        I expect that it also hurts like a bitch.
        This could be the man to ask about that.

        Click image for larger version

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        "I used to read, but it's faster to make up stuff" - Wally (Dilbert)

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        • #5
          Is that the terminator? :O

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          • #6
            Thanks guys for your answers ill definitely look into SPT and more endurance lighter weights more reps.
            "Audentes fortuna iuvat" - "Fortune favors the bold"

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            • #7
              http://nockon.podbean.com/

              Nock On did a podcast about this recently. And yes that is the terminator, the guy Dudley interviews in the podcast used to train with him.

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              • #8
                For me personally it has.

                I've recently got back to the gym after a two year hiatus. I'm currently going through a HST cycle for a gauge on what I'm doing.

                I feel the training has helped with fatigue in my back and shoulders enabling more controlled shot execution. It has also enabled the use of a lot more weight my Stabilizers which has definitely helped the aiming processes.

                In saying this these improvements are indirect on archery performance.
                If I were interested in improving my archer scores I'd spend more time behind a bow.

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                • #9
                  PJ Deloche and Braden Gellenthien have both said that too much weight training for strength causes them to lose the "feel" or "sense" of the shot, so they restrict most weight training to off-season. I suspect this would not be a problem faced by your average coach potato archer (and given the amount they shoot in practice they are probably already as archery-fit as they might ever need to be.

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                  • #10
                    Good point Fanio I am currently shooting about 200 odd arrows a day and on mon, wed and friday shooting indoors at my local club. I guess I'm just so used to lifting weights as part of my normal training regime with nearly every other sport I have played. It seemed like the thing to do but upon talking to people and reading the comments here I'll just go back to light weights or no weights and do more cardio specific type training.

                    Thanks again to all for your comments I appreciate your input.
                    "Audentes fortuna iuvat" - "Fortune favors the bold"

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                    • #11
                      I expect dumbell rows (on your draw arm side) would be beneficial as the exercise uses alot of the muscle groups as you do whilst drawing, especially if the exercise is modified so that you are lifting the dumbell toward your upper pec or shoulder.
                      Last edited by etwolf; 24th May 2014, 01:09 AM.

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                      • #12
                        If you would like to do a simple test as how progressive weight training would be useful in archery just grab two buckets of different weights and see how long you can hold them out until the arm shakes.

                        We all know that the heavier bucket will tire the muscle faster and cause shaking because it is better conditioned for the lighter weight.

                        The greater degree of neural activity need for a task the less fine motor control of the musculature.

                        As muscle tissue fatigues the more indirect musculature will become involved to assist with the load, decreasing the ability to control fine musculature movement and resulting in tremors.

                        Over training can create a greater overload of the central nervous system resulting in a delayed recovery to the neural ennervation of that musculature delaying the ability to maintain fine motor control.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Warlocke View Post
                          If you would like to do a simple test as how progressive weight training would be useful in archery just grab two buckets of different weights and see how long you can hold them out until the arm shakes.

                          We all know that the heavier bucket will tire the muscle faster and cause shaking because it is better conditioned for the lighter weight.

                          The greater degree of neural activity need for a task the less fine motor control of the musculature.

                          As muscle tissue fatigues the more indirect musculature will become involved to assist with the load, decreasing the ability to control fine musculature movement and resulting in tremors.

                          Over training can create a greater overload of the central nervous system resulting in a delayed recovery to the neural ennervation of that musculature delaying the ability to maintain fine motor control.
                          Thanks for that. It will give me added ammo in my quest to return to the couch. I've been under pressure for some time from club officials to weight train, and have been resisting it since I already have RSI in various places, especially my beer drinking arm. The only addendum I can propose for you young blokes out there is beware overdoing it in your youth. It will catch up with you later. Not that you'll listen. I certainly did not.
                          "Courtesy is free; it just requires making the effort not to be rude."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Warlocke View Post
                            If you would like to do a simple test as how progressive weight training would be useful in archery just grab two buckets of different weights and see how long you can hold them out until the arm shakes.

                            We all know that the heavier bucket will tire the muscle faster and cause shaking because it is better conditioned for the lighter weight.

                            The greater degree of neural activity need for a task the less fine motor control of the musculature.

                            As muscle tissue fatigues the more indirect musculature will become involved to assist with the load, decreasing the ability to control fine musculature movement and resulting in tremors.

                            Over training can create a greater overload of the central nervous system resulting in a delayed recovery to the neural ennervation of that musculature delaying the ability to maintain fine motor control.
                            Completely agree with over-training = neural exhaustion (shaking and vomiting is for cross-fitters, not archers); however, a light weight seated row, 3-5 sets with 15+ reps, squeezing the shoulder blades at the end of the concentric phase (when your hands are near your chest) will activate the rhomboids (deep muscles in your upper back), which are an oft-neglected muscle group and very important for archery.
                            Keeping weight low and reps high will keep you out of that hypertrophy range (body-building), so that you can avoid bow-slapping your biceps (don't we all know how that feels...).

                            Don't be afraid of exercise. Being fit and healthy is only a good thing.
                            -What did you think was going to happen..?

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                            • #15
                              Having a strong core, back and shoulder girdle are of key importance. I've found that pilates and functional exercises (eg. climbing and pull ups) have helped more rather than weights. They also assist with good posture and injury prevention.

                              Surprisingly, the strength regimen that I found of most use was circus skills - silks, pole and lyra. I was doing these before I started archery and was able to move to a from the 18lb club bow to my own 30lb bow pretty quickly.

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