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  • Bow torque

    I have been looking in detail at bow torque (that is: the archer twisting the bow laterally) and its impact on the archer's score.
    Note that in any of these technique or equipment imperfections it is variation which is the killer. You can make errors but so long as it is identical every shot it can be readily dealt with. Where we get variation fromn shot to shot we can then get score degradation - and sometimes very significant score degradation.

    I have come to the conclusion that bow toque is a very important element of an archer's technique. It is a major detractor from score.
    Particularly for a recurve bow, a small variation in bow torque can lead to major lateral elongation of the archer's group and hence to major degradation of score.

    To assess the ease of twisting the bow I have measured it for my recurve bow - they are easy to twist. You can do this very readily by drawing the bow and seeing where the arrow is aligned with the stabiliser. Then lightly twist the bow and see how the alignment changes - it is very easy to change it by a lot, and easily enough to seriously impact your score.

    This tells me two things:

    First, it is very important that you have a bowhand position that does not twist the bow.

    Second, it is very important indeed that you draw the bow in a manner that does not move the string out of the plane that the bow will be in when at full draw, otherwise you will almost certainly twist the bow and end up with variation.

    It is the second of those aspects that is most likely to introduce variation from shot to shot.
    That is, in drawing the bow the drawing hand must stay in the plane that the bow will be in when at full draw, otherwise you are almost certainly damaging your score.
    Scout strings and stabilisers
    Accurate Sights
    Titan Scopes

  • #2
    Originally posted by James Park View Post

    Second, it is very important indeed that you draw the bow in a manner that does not move the string out of the plane that the bow will be in when at full draw, otherwise you will almost certainly twist the bow and end up with variation.
    James, I don't know if you have noticed, but every time a bow (let's say, a hoyt) is drawn, the plane changes with respect to the riser. So it is rather difficult (if not pointless) to endeavor to keep within a plane that itself does not stay. I think other than keeping one's thumb pointed to the front and not pinching the grip, there's really nothing much we can do.
    The irony of eagerly promoting indifference. Eh Scott?

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    • #3
      Crosshairs,
      It is variation that we must avoid.
      If the riser moves with respect to the plane of the bow then so long as it does it the same each time it is not a problem at all.
      What I am saying is that the archer should not draw the bow in a manner that provokes variation from arrow-to-arrow.
      If the archer's drawing hand moves out of the plane and then back into it it is introducing a movement that will inevitably have variation in the bow torque and hence score loss. That is, don't do the thing that lets variation creep in.
      Last edited by James Park; 24th August 2012, 08:00 AM.
      Scout strings and stabilisers
      Accurate Sights
      Titan Scopes

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      • #4
        This is something I've been working on this week.

        But if you correct it straight after drawing, before you begin aiming, and you do it consistently each time, is that not okay?

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        • #5
          Sure, if you can correct it exactly every time. (How would you do that, by the way?)
          My experience is that you cannot (I have tried).
          Much better to not have to worry about it by having a drawing technique that minimises the problem.
          Scout strings and stabilisers
          Accurate Sights
          Titan Scopes

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by James Park View Post
            If the riser moves with respect to the plane of the bow then so long as it does it the same each time it is not a problem at all.
            .
            Here's my problem: Each time I draw on the string, if there is a plane, it warps. If I could mount a laser on the center of the riser(between the bolts and equidistant) that point dead on the string, every time I draw the string, the laser would point away (for a right handed riser, laser points away to the left, archer's view, and for lefties vice versa). It doesn't matter if I am using fingers or even a D-loop with a release. You can try it with a setup. The effect is less pronounced for grips that are shifted to the right, for risers like GMX or HPX/FRX. In fact I predict the effect to be even less on a PSE X-appeal, but a nett rotation of the riser with respect to the plane formed by the draw string, during the draw.
            The irony of eagerly promoting indifference. Eh Scott?

            Comment


            • #7
              However, that 'warping' you mention will be the same each time, so it will not affect the accuracy or score. You tune the bow and set the sight accordingly.
              The one I am talking about is technique-induced variation from arrow to arrow, which will certainly affect the score.
              Scout strings and stabilisers
              Accurate Sights
              Titan Scopes

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              • #8
                understood.
                The irony of eagerly promoting indifference. Eh Scott?

                Comment


                • #9
                  You can investigate the effect of bow torque yourself, very easily.
                  At full draw, see where the arrow is lined up with the long stabiliser - it might not be down the centre, but that does not matter.
                  Shoot a few arrows and see where they go.
                  Next, at full draw, twist the bow a little so that the arrow is lined up with the stabiliser differently.
                  For a right handed archer it is best to twist the bow counter-clockwise as seen from above as otherwise you might have the string hit your arm.
                  Don't twist it too much as we don't want the string to come off, and if you twist it too much your arrows might miss the target altogether.
                  Shoot a few arrows and see how far your group has shifted (to the left for a right handed archer).
                  It is very easy indeed to get them to move many target rings, as the arrow flight is strongly influenced by the bow torque.
                  It should be very easy to see that any variation in bow torque will have a major impact on your score.

                  For a compound bow you can set your sight extension length to counteract this movement, which is very handy (an extension length of about 20 cm should do it).
                  However, with a recurve bow you cannot get the extension long enough to counter it. Also if you make the extension too long you will not be able to get your sight low enough for the longer distances.

                  That is, especially for a recurve bow you need to have a drawing technique that does not introduce variation in bow torque.
                  Last edited by James Park; 24th August 2012, 08:26 PM.
                  Scout strings and stabilisers
                  Accurate Sights
                  Titan Scopes

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Will a cross along the grip's vertical (recurve) help control or enduce bow torque?

                    I've been thinking of getting rid of my side stablisers but the shot always does feel different without them (less stable) and it always wants to twist after the release (spins the bow to the right).
                    "Power draws the bow; timing releases the arrow." - Sun Tzu

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                    • #11
                      So the old advice that after raising the bow, you should draw in a straight line directly back to your anchor point is still good advice.

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                      • #12
                        Good advice but hard to do if you have recently had a release malfunction and whacked yourself in the face

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                        • #13
                          Long Live Recurve Archery
                          The irony of eagerly promoting indifference. Eh Scott?

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                          • #14
                            If the string window is the same each shot, can the bow torque still differ?

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                            • #15
                              Yes.
                              The irony of eagerly promoting indifference. Eh Scott?

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